Banner

.s

Banner

Live in Texas: Sir Douglas Quintet

Attention: open in a new window. PDFPrintE-mail

 

Live in Texas Presents: Sir Douglas Quintet

 

 

 

The Sir Douglas Quintet was a rock band active in the mid-1960s and 1970s, with reunions amongst various members in the 1980s and 1990s. Despite their British-sounding name, they came out of San Antonio, Texas. With their first hits, they were acclaimed in their home state. However, once their career was established (subsequent to working with Texas record-producer Huey Meaux), the band relocated to the West Coast. Their move coincided with the burgeoning San Francisco psychedelic rock scene of the mid-1960s to early 1970s. Overall, the Quintet were exponents of good-times music with strong roots in blues and Texas-regional traditions. Doug Sahm, a veteran of the professional music scene who first sang on the radio at the age of five, formed the Quintet (first called simply 'Sir Douglas') in 1964 with longtime friend Augie Meyers and the other original members Jack Barber, Frank Morin and Johnny Perez. Sahm had started out in the country music scene, and had even played (at age eleven) on-stage with Hank Williams, Sr., during the latter's final performance. Sahm went on to play in blues clubs in his teenage years and he had gained experience as a band leader.The initial success of the new group, the Quintet, on the airwaves and sales charts was achieved when they made records in conjunction with Houston music producer Huey P. Meaux. Houston's recording industry had become the center of Texas R&B music. The Quintet was born in a cross-cultural South-Texas musical melting pot, which included the sounds and traditions of Mexico, Bohemia, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Germany, and African-America. But aware of the major trends, producer Huey Meaux advised connecting the new group with the English pop-music trend. As a consequence, the Texas-local R&B, Tex-Mex, and other veins the musicians were familiar with initially went through a period of influence by the British pop bands of the early and mid-1960s. For a short while, the youthful members of the group emulated Beatles-like "mop-top" demeanor and antics on stage. However, they soon outgrew these trappings.