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Live in Texas: Stoney LaRue

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Live in Texas Presents: Stoney LaRue

 

 

Stoney LaRue (born Stoney Larue Phillips in 1977) is a Texas Country artist. Born in Taft, Texas, LaRue was raised in Southeastern Oklahoma and began playing country music at a young age. LaRue moved to Stillwater, Oklahoma and began to play in the various bars around the college town, as well as his brother, Bo Phillips and sister, Hallie Bertrand. He befriended Jason Boland and Cody Canada and the three moved into the infamous "Yellow House" where they would have late night jam sessions and entertain other various musicians around the town, like Mike McClure and Brandon Jenkins. In 2002, LaRue led The Organic Boogie Band and released Downtown, recorded in private sessions at Cain’s Ballroom in Tulsa. LaRue's 2005 follow-up, The Red Dirt Album, reached the Billboard sales charts in its debut week. The next year, Stoney released his first live record Live at Billy Bob's Texas. Stoney LaRue didn’t plan to take six years between studio albums, but there was an awful lot of life and music going on. For one of the icons of the Red Dirt Music movement, it was always about the moment that drove him to his next destination. “Live at Billy Bob’s was like jumping straight into the fire: two weeks after putting the band together, we recorded the album, hit the road and did 250 dates a year. We never looked back.” Not looking back has been an earmark of LaRue’s roots hybrid, a sweeping musical narrative that embraces a man’s yearning, vulnerability, venality and desire.  After six years and all that living, Velvet marks a new kind of cohesion for the man who’s built a career on live performances. Working with award-winning producer Frank Liddell and Mike McCarthy; Velvet was recorded over three years in Nashville, and finds LaRue melting down the playbook and expectations for everyone involved. Liddell enlisted Glenn Worf on bass, Randy Scruggs on acoustic, Glen Duncan on fiddle, Chad Cromwell and Fred Eltringham on drums, Oran Thornton on guitar and Jim Hoke on accordion, steel and flute. Recognizing the power of cohesion for LaRue’s voice, Liddell recorded the sessions with everyone on the floor, letting the musicians bleed into each other’s tracks. In an attempt to draw out the sentiments beneath the surface, Liddell introduced LaRue to several “outsider” songwriters, including Mando Saenz.  Saenz was born in San Luis Potosi, Mexico and has lived in North Carolina, California, Oklahoma, Texas and Tennessee. He understands the reality of being a man always en route to somewhere else, the quest that is life. Certainly, there is a mystical, cedar’n’sunlight-on-the-dust nature to Velvet. In “The Travelin’ Kind,” LaRue ponders the reality of those who stay in one place versus those who’re born to drift. Life isn’t just about contemplation, though. There’s also an edge of lust and danger. As the fiddle-stitched “Sirens” whirls through a brisk core sample of desire and life on the run, LaRue suggests that restless doesn’t always mean comfortable. Nor is it the ultimate end game. Velvet paints a picture of what it means to be free but aware, willing but uncertain – and always, always drawn to the light.  Stoney LaRue is sure of it – and it echoes on all 10 tracks.

 

 

Love You For Loving Me - Sorry No Videos are available for this song

 

 

Goin' Down The Road (Feelin' Bad) - Sorry No Videos are available for this song

 

Downtown - Sorry No Videos are available for this song

 

Walk Away - Sorry No Videos are available for this song

 

 

The Weight - Sorry No Videos are available for this song